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LAURIC ACID ( LAURİK ASİT)

LAURIC ACID (LAURİK ASİT)

 

CAS NUMBER:143-07-7
SYNONYMS:Lauric acid; DODECANOIC ACID; 143-07-7; N-Dodecanoic acid; Dodecylic acid; Vulvic acid;Dodecanoic acid;ABL, Dodecanoic acid, Lauric acid;LAURICACID; LAURIC ACID; LAURIK ASİT; LAURIKASİT; LAURİKASİT; LAURİK ASİT; laurıc acıd; laurıcacıd; laurik asit; laurik asit; laurıkasit; laurık asit;DODECANOIC ACID; DODECYLIC ACID; N-DODECANOIC ACID; 1-UNDECANECARBOXYLIC ACID; C-1297; DODECANOIC ACID; DODECOIC ACID; DUODECYLIC ACID; HYDROFOL ACID 1255; HYDROFOL ACID 1295; HYSTRENE 9512; n-Dodecanoic acid, Dodecylic acid, Dodecoic acid, Laurostearic acid, Vulvic acid, 1-Undecanecarboxylic acid, Duodecylic acid, C12: 0; C12; NAA122; NAA312;C-1297;12 acid; Emery651; LunacL70; LunacL98; NSC 5026; neo-fat12; lde; AC 1000; LA 2000; emid6511; emid6541; Lalmin D; ninol4821; ninolaa62; onyxol345; rolamidcd; laurik asit: lauric asit; laurrik asit; lauric aside; laurik asit; dodekonoik asit; dodecanoic acid; lauric acid; ammonium salt; lauric acidi barium and cadmium salt (4:1:1); lauric acid; calcium salt; lithium salt; magnesium salt; nickel(2+) salt; lauric acid; potassium salt; sodium salt; potassium laurate; sodium dodecanoate; sodium laurate lauric acid; DODECANOIC ACID; 143-07-7; n-Dodecanoic acid; Dodecylic acid; Vulvic acid; Laurostearic acid; Dodecoic acid; Duodecylic acid; 1-Undecanecarboxylic acid; Aliphat No. 4; Neo-fat 12; C12 fatty acid; Ninol AA62 Extra; Wecoline 1295; Neo-fat 12-43; Hydrofol acid 1255; Hydrofol acid 1295; Duodecyclic acid; Hystrene 9512; Dodecylcarboxylate; Univol U-314; Lauric acid; pure; Lauric acid (natural); Coconut oil fatty acids; ABL; Undecane-1-carboxylic acid; Laurinsaeure; NSC-5026; MFCD00002736; CCRIS 669; C-1297; UNII-1160N9NU9U; FEMA No. 2614; n-Dodecanoate; Philacid 1200; Dodecanoic Acid Anion; CHEBI:30805; Prifrac 2920; HSDB 6814; Lunac L 70; Emery 651; C12:0; EINECS 205-582-1; BRN 1099477; AI3-00112; DAO; CH3-[CH2]10-COOH; NSC5026; POULHZVOKOAJMA; UHFFFAOYSA-N; 1160N9NU9U; dodecylate; laurostearate; vulvate; DODECANOIC ACID (LAURIC ACID); LAP; Lauric acid, 99%; DSSTox_CID_1590; 1-undecanecarboxylate; DSSTox_RID_76223; DSSTox_GSID_21590; CAS-143-07-7; LAU; SMR001253907; lauricacid; laurinsaure; Dodecanoic acid(Lauric acid); dodecanic acid; lauric-acid; Acide Laurique; dilauric acid; Lauric acid (NF); Lauric Acid 652; Kortacid 1299; OA(1)ethEa; Nissan NAA 122; Emery 650; Lunac L 98; Prifac 2920; Univol U 314; Dodecanoic acid, 98%; Dodecanoic acid, 99%; ACMC-1BTHL; Dodecanoic (Lauric) acidbmse000509; EC 205-582-1; AC1L1GY2; AC1Q5W8C; SCHEMBL5895; NCIOpen2_009480; 4-02-00-01082 (Beilstein Handbook Reference); KSC176I2N; MLS002177807; MLS002415737; WLN: QV11; Dodecanoic acid (lauric acid); Dodecanoic acid, >=99.5%; Edenor C 1298-100; CHEMBL108766; Dodecanoic acid, >=99% (GC/titration)

 

 

Lauric acid or systematically, dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus having many properties of medium-chain fatty acids, is a bright white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap. The salts and esters of lauric acid are known as laurates. Lauric acid, as a component of triglycerides, comprises about half of the fatty-acid content in coconut milk, coconut oil, laurel oil, and palm kernel oil (not to be confused with palm oil),[10][11] Otherwise, it is relatively uncommon. It is also found in human breast milk (6.2% of total fat), cow's milk (2.9%), and goat's milk (3.1%).[10]
In various plants
• The palm tree Attalea speciosa, a species popularly known in Brazil as babassu - 50% in babassu oil
• Attalea cohune, the cohune palm (also rain tree, American oil palm, corozo palm or manaca palm) - 46.5% in cohune oil
• Astrocaryum murumuru (Arecaceae) a palm native to the Amazon - 47.5% in "murumuru butter"
• Coconut oil 49%
• Pycnanthus kombo (African nutmeg)
• Virola surinamensis (wild nutmeg) 7.8-11.5%
• Peach palm seed 10.4%
• Betel nut 9%
• Date palm seed 0.56-5.4%
• Durio graveolens (a species of durian) 1.31%.[12]
• Macadamia nut 0.072-1.1%
• Plum 0.35-0.38%
• Watermelon seed 0.33%
Properties
Although 95% of medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed through the portal vein, only 25-30% of lauric acid is absorbed through it.[13]
Like many other fatty acids, lauric acid is inexpensive, has a long shelf-life, is nontoxic, and is safe to handle. It is used mainly for the production of soaps and cosmetics. For these purposes, lauric acid is reacted with sodium hydroxide to give sodium laurate, which is a soap. Most commonly, sodium laurate is obtained by saponification of various oils, such as coconut oil. These precursors give mixtures of sodium laurate and other soaps.[11]
Laboratory use
In the laboratory, lauric acid may be used to investigate the molar mass of an unknown substance via the freezing-point depression. The choice of lauric acid is convenient because the melting point of the pure compound is relatively high (43.8°C). Its cryoscopic constant is 3.9°C·kg/mol. By melting lauric acid with the unknown substance, allowing it to cool, and recording the temperature at which the mixture freezes, the molar mass of the unknown compound may be determined.

Potential medicinal properties
In vitro experiments have suggested that some fatty acids including lauric acid could be a useful component in a treatment for acne, but no clinical trials have yet been conducted to evaluate this potential benefit in humans.[15][16]
Lauric acid increases total serum cholesterol more than many other fatty acids, but most of the increase is attributable to an increase in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (the "good" blood cholesterol). As a result, lauric acid has been characterized as having "a more favorable effect on total HDL cholesterol than any other fatty acid [examined], either saturated or unsaturated".[17] In general, a lower total/HDL serum cholesterol ratio correlates with a decrease in atherosclerotic risk.[18] Nonetheless, an extensive meta-analysis on foods affecting the total LDL /serum cholesterol ratio found in 2003 that the net effects of lauric acid on coronary artery disease outcomes remained uncertain.[19] A 2016 review of coconut oil (which is nearly half lauric acid) was similarly inconclusive about the effects on cardiovascular disease risk.[13]
Pumpkin flower 205 ppm, pumpkin seed 472 ppmDodecanoic acid is a straight-chain, twelve-carbon medium-chain saturated fatty acid with strong bactericidal properties; the main fatty acid in coconut oil and palm kernel oil. It has a role as a plant metabolite, an antibacterial agent and an algal metabolite. It is a straight-chain saturated fatty acid and a medium-chain fatty acid. It is a conjugate acid of a dodecanoate. It derives from a hydride of a dodecane.
from ChEBILauric acid is a white solid with a slight odor of bay oil. (USCG, 1999).Lauric acid is an inexpensive, non-toxic and safe to handle compound often used in laboratory investigations of melting-point depression. Lauric acid is a solid at room temperature but melts easily in boiling water, so liquid lauric acid can be treated with various solutes and used to determine their molecular masses. Lauric acid is a saturated fat. It is found in many vegetable fats, particularly in coconut and palm kernel oils. People use it as medicine.Lauric acid is used for treating viral infections including influenza (the flu); swine flu; avian flu; the common cold; fever blisters, cold sores, and genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV); genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV); and HIV/AIDS. It is also used for preventing the transmission of HIV from mothers to children.Other uses for lauric acid include treatment of bronchitis, gonorrhea, yeast infections, chlamydia, intestinal infections caused by a parasite called Giardia lamblia, and ringworm.In foods, lauric acid is used as a vegetable shortening.In manufacturing, lauric acid is used to make soap and shampoo. Lauric acid or systematically, dodecanoic acid, is a saturated fatty acid with a 12-carbon atom chain, thus having many properties of medium chain fatty acids, is a white, powdery solid with a faint odor of bay oil or soap. The salts and esters of lauric acid are known as laurates.Lauric acid, as a component of triglycerides, comprises about half of the fatty acid content in coconut milk, coconut oil, laurel oil, and palm kernel oil (not to be confused with palm oil), Otherwise, it is relatively uncommon. It is also found in human breast milk (6.2% of total fat), cow's milk (2.9%), and goat's milk (3.1%).Coconut oil is all the rage in natural beauty and health regimens. Countless blogs and natural health websites tout it as a miracle product, able to do everything from soothe cracked skin to reverse cavities. But when you break coconut oil down into its active parts, like lauric acid, things start to look less miraculous and more like science! Lauric acid is a medium-length long-chain fatty acid, or lipid, that makes up about half of the fatty acids within coconut oil. It's a powerful substance that is sometimes extracted from the coconut for use in developing monolaurin. Monolaurin is an antimicrobial agent that is able to fight bacteria, viruses, yeasts, and other pathogens. Because you can't ingest lauric acid alone (it's irritating and not found alone in nature), you're most likely to get it in the form of coconut oil or from fresh coconuts.The primary fatty acid of coconut oil is lauric acid, which is present at approximately 45-53 %. The metabolic and physiological properties of lauric acid account for many of the properties of coconut oil. Coconut oil is rapidly metabolized because it is easily absorbed and lauric acid is easily transported. Detailed studies have shown that the majority of ingested lauric acid is transported directly to the liver where it is directly converted to energy and other metabolites rather than being stored as fat. Such metabolites include ketone bodies, which can be used by extrahepatic tissues, such as the brain and heart, as an immediate form of energy. Studies on the effect of lauric acid on serum cholesterol are contradictory. Among saturated fatty acids, lauric acid has been shown to contribute the least to fat accumulation. Lauric acid and monolaurin have demonstrably significant antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria and a number of fungi and viruses. Today there are many commercial products that use lauric acid and monolaurin as antimicrobial agents. Because of the significant differences in the properties of lauric acid relative to longer chain fatty acids, they are typically differentiated as medium-chain fatty acids covering C6-C12, and long-chain fatty acids covering C14 and longer.Lauric Acid is the main fatty acid in coconut oil as well as palm kernel oil; it is also found in human milk, cow's milk, and goat's milk. It is used in beauty products and skin care because of its moisturizing abilities, and is also recognized as an acne-fighter thanks to its anti-microbial properties Source).

 

 

Coconut oil is all the rage in natural beauty and health regimens. Countless blogs and natural health websites tout it as a miracle product, able to do everything from soothe cracked skin to reverse cavities.However, when you break coconut oil down into its active parts, things start to look less miraculous and more like science.Lauric acid is one of those active parts. It's a medium-length long-chain fatty acid, or lipid, that makes up about half of the fatty acids within coconut oil.
Where to find lauric acid
Lauric acid is a powerful substance that's sometimes extracted from the coconut for use in developing monolaurin. Monolaurin is an antimicrobial agent that's able to fight pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and yeasts.Because it's irritating and not found alone in nature, you can't ingest lauric acid on its own. You're most likely to get it in the form of coconut oil or from fresh coconuts.Coconut oil is white and solid below 75℉ (23.9°C). It's liquid above that.It's over 80 percent saturated fat.It contains caprylic acid, which can help treat yeast infections.What the research says.Though coconut oil is being studied at a breakneck pace, much of the research doesn't pinpoint what in the oil is responsible for its reported benefits. Because coconut oil contains much more than just lauric acid, it would be a stretch to credit lauric acid with all of coconut oil's benefits.Still, a 2015 analysis proposed that many of the benefits tied to coconut oil are directly linked to lauric acid. They suggest that lauric acid could aid in weight loss and protect against Alzheimer's disease, among other benefits. Its effects on blood cholesterol levels still need to be clarified.This research suggests that the benefits of lauric acid are a result of how the body uses the acid.The majority of lauric acid is sent directly to the liver, where it's converted to energy rather than stored as fat. When compared with other saturated fats, lauric acid contributes the least to fat storage.Bloggers and natural health websites often recommend coconut oil as a treatment for dry skin and conditions such as psoriasis. Again, because lauric acid is only part of what makes up coconut oil, it's difficult to say if the fatty acid alone or a combination of coconut oil components is responsible for these benefits.

Coconut oil is highly moisturizing and considered safe to apply to skin, making it beneficial for treating abnormally dry skin.A 2013 study found that merely adding virgin coconut oil to an existing skin lotion resulted in an increase in both hydration and skin elasticity.Lauric acid for acne. Because lauric acid has antibacterial properties, it's been found to effectively combat acne. The bacteria Propionibacterium acnes are found naturally on the skin. When they overgrow, they lead to the development of acne.The results of a 2009 study found that lauric acid could reduce inflammation and the number of bacteria present. Lauric acid worked even better than benzoyl peroxide, a common acne treatment. A 2016 study also reconfirmed the acne-fighting properties of lauric acid.This doesn't mean you should put coconut oil on your acne. The researchers used pure lauric acid and suggested that it could be developed into an antibiotic therapy for acne in the future.To reap the topical benefits of lauric acid and coconut oil, apply it directly to your skin. While this isn't recommended for people with acne, the risks are minimal when it comes to addressing issues such as skin hydration and psoriasis.Coconut oil can be used in cooking as well. Its sweet, nutty flavor makes it the perfect addition to desserts, including double chocolate paleo brownies and paleo banana bread.You can also use it to sauté vegetables or to add flavor to mashed sweet potatoes or a Caribbean curry soup.The takeaway.Even if coconut oil isn't quite the cure-all that others claim it to be, it still has multiple health benefits. Lauric acid may be directly responsible for some of those benefits.Be mindful of how much fat you take in overall, but don't hesitate to add coconut oil or lauric acid to your diet. Topical use may transform your skin care routine too.Try it: Shop for coconut oil or lauric acid.Curious about mindful eating? We can give you a taste.Are you ready to give mindful eating a shot? Our nutrition newsletter can help you try it. Take the Mindful Eating Challenge and learn how to create lasting, healthy habits around food. Although 95% of medium chain triglycerides are absorbed through the portal vein, only 25-30% of lauric acid is absorbed through the portal vein. Like many other fatty acids, lauric acid is inexpensive, has a long shelf-life, is non-toxic and is safe to handle. It is used mainly for the production of soaps and cosmetics. For these purposes, lauric acid is reacted with sodium hydroxide to give sodium laurate, which is a soap. Most commonly, sodium laurate is obtained by saponification of various oils, such as coconut oil. These precursors give mixtures of sodium laurate and other soaps. In the laboratory, lauric acid may be used to investigate the molar mass of an unknown substance via the freezing-point depression. The choice of lauric acid is convenient because the melting point of the pure compound is relatively high (43.8 °C). Its cryoscopic constant is 3.9 °C·kg/mol. By melting lauric acid with the unknown substance, allowing it to cool, and recording the temperature at which the mixture freezes, the molar mass of the unknown compound may be determined.In vitro experiments have suggested that some fatty acids including lauric acid could be a useful component in a treatment for acne, but no clinical trials have yet been conducted to evaluate this potential benefit in humans.Lauric acid increases total serum cholesterol more than many other fatty acids. But most of the increase is attributable to an increase in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (the "good" blood cholesterol). As a result, lauric acid has been characterized as having "a more favorable effect on total HDL cholesterol than any other fatty acid [examined], either saturated or unsaturated".In general, a lower total/HDL serum cholesterol ratio correlates with a decrease in atherosclerotic risk.Nonetheless, an extensive meta-analysis on foods affecting the total LDL /serum cholesterol ratio found in 2003 that the net effects of lauric acid on coronary artery disease outcomes remained uncertain. A 2016 review of coconut oil (which is nearly half lauric acid) was similarly inconclusive about the effects on cardiovascular disease risk.

LAURIC ACID BENEFITS
When lauric acid is present in the body, it is converted into monolaurin, a monoglyceride compound which exhibits antiviral, antimicrobial, antiprotozoal and antifungal properties. It acts by disrupting the lipid membranes in organisms like fungus, bacteria and viruses, thus destroying them. The compound monolaurin is an effective treatment for candida albicans and fungal infections like ringworm and athlete's foot. Monolaurin also specifically targets bacterial infections as well as lipid-coated viruses like herpes, the measles, influenza, hepatitis C and HIV. Researchers in the Philippines have even begun studies to research the effectiveness of lauric acid against HIV/AIDS because of its strong antiviral properties. Plus, lauric acid is essentially non-toxic, which gives it a distinct advantage over modern pharmaceutical drugs that are typically used to fight viruses, bacterial infections and fungal infections (I mean, heck, I'd rather down some coconut oil over conventional drugs any day!). Without a plentiful source of lauric acid, the body cannot produce monolaurin, and all of these important benefits are lost. Many people who regularly consume coconut oil experience less sickness. Breast milk is the only other natural source that contains such a high concentration of lauric acid, which could explain the drastic decrease of infections of all types in breastfed babies.

 

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