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OLEİL SETİL ALKOL (OLEYL CETYL ALCOHOL)

Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol
CAS NO 143-28-2

METATAGS:oleyl alkol; oleyl/cetil alkol; oleyl/cetyl alkol; oleyl/cetyl alcohol; oleyl/cetyl; oleıl/cetyl; oleil/cetyl; oleyl/setil; oleyl/setıl; oleil alkol; oleil alcohol;oleıl alkol; oleıl alcohol; oleyl alcohol; oleyl alkol; oleyl cetil alkol; oleyl cetıl alkol; oleyl cetıl alcohol; oleyl cetyl alkol; oleyl cetyl alcohol; oleil cetyl alkol; oleıl cetyl alkol; oleil cetyl alcohol; oleyl cetil alcohol; oleyl; oleil; oleıl; cetil; cetıl; setil; alkol; alcohol; setıl; oleil cetil alkol; oleıl cetil alkol; oleil setil alkol; oleil setıl alkol; oleil cetil alcohol; oleil cetıl alcohol; oleıl cetil alcohol; oleıl setil alcohol; oleıl setıl alcohol; alkol; alcohol; alcohl; setil alkol; setıl alkol; setil alcohol; setıl alcohol; cetil alkol; cetıl alkol; cetıl alcohol; cetil alcohol; cis-9-Octadecen-1-ol; (Z)-octadec-9-en-1-ol; 143-28-2; Ocenol; Dermaffine; Lancol; Novol; Oceol; Oleol; Satol; Oleic alcohol; Oleo alcohol; Crodacol-O;Conditioner 1; Loxanol M; Atalco O; Siponol OC; Sipol O; Octadecenol; (Z)-9-Octadecen-1-ol; Cachalot O-1; Cachalot O-3; Cachalot O-8; H.D. eutanol; HD-Ocenol K; Loxanol 95; Unjecol 50; Unjecol 70; Unjecol 90; Oleoyl alcohol; Olive alcohol; Cachalot O-15; Crodacol A.10; Unjecol 110; HD oleyl alcohol CG; cis-9-Octadecenyl alcohol; (Z)-Octadec-9-enol; Adol 34; Adol 80; Adol 85; Adol 90; HD-Ocenol 90/95; HD oleyl alcohol 70/75; HD oleyl alcohol 80/85;HD oleyl alcohol 90/95; Witcohol 85; Witcohol 90; 9-Octadecen-1-ol, (Z)-; Adol 320; Adol 330; Adol 340; 0leyl alcohol; (9Z)-octadec-9-en-1-ol; cis-octadecen-1-ol; Oleylalcohol; HD-Eutanol; Octadec-9Z-enol; cis-9-octadecenol; UNII-172F2WN8DV; (9Z)-9-Octadecen-1-ol; (Z)-9-octadecenol; 9Z-Octadecen-1-ol; Oleyl alcohol (NF); Oleyl alcohol [NF]; Z-9-Dodecen-1-ol; ( Z)-9-octadecenol; HSDB 6484; Witco ol 85 (TN); 9-Octadecen-1-ol, (9Z)-; EINECS 205-597-3; 9-Octadecen-1-ol; MFCD00002993; NSC 10999; 9-Octadecen-1-ol, cis-; AI3-07620; 172F2WN8DV; CHEBI:73504; ALSTYHKOOCGGFT-KTKRTIGZSA-N; Octadec-9-en-1-ol; W-109512; 9-Octadecenol; Oleyl alcohol, ca. 60%, technical; Lipocol O; cis-Oleyl alcohol; C18H36O; Anjecol 90N; Unjecol 90N; Z)-oleyl alcohol; Anjecol 90NR; Unjecol 90NR; Francol OA-95; Fancol OA-95; cis 9 octadecen-1-ol; Oleyl Alkol; Oleyl/Cetyl; Oleıl/Cetyl; Oleil/Cetyl; Oleyl/Setil; Oleyl/Setıl; Oleil Alkol; Oleil Alcohol; Oleıl Alkol; Oleıl Alcohol; Oleyl Alcohol; Oleyl Alkol; Oleyl Cetil Alkol; Oleyl Cetıl Alkol; Oleyl Cetıl Alcohol; Oleyl Cetil Alcohol; Oleyl; Oleil; Oleıl; Cetil; Cetıl; Setil; Alkol; Alcohol; Setıl; Oleil Cetil Alkol; Oleıl Cetil Alkol; Oleil Setil Alkol; Oleil Setıl Alkol; Oleil Cetil Alcohol; Oleil Cetıl Alcohol; Oleıl Cetil Alcohol; Oleıl Setil Alcohol; Oleıl Setıl Alcohol; Alkol; Alcohol; Alcohl; Setil Alkol; Setıl Alkol; Setil Alcohol; Setıl Alcohol; Cetil Alkol; Cetıl Alkol; Cetıl Alcohol; Cetil Alcohol; cis-9-0ctadecen-1-ol; 9(Z)-Octadecen-1-ol; AC1NR4KM; HD-Echelon 90/95; DSSTox_CID_2010; Octadeca-9-cis-en-1-ol; EC 205-597-3; cis-.DELTA.9-Octadecenol; HD-Ocenol 90/95 V; SCHEMBL5668; (Z)-octadeca-9-en-1-ol; DSSTox_RID_76459; DSSTox_GSID_22010; (9Z)-9-Octadecen-1-ol #; Octadec-9-en-1-ol, (Z)-; CHEMBL2105350; DTXSID0022010; Oleyl alcohol, >=99% (GC); Oleyl alcohol, analytical standard; cis-Laquo deltaRaquo 9-Octadeceno; NSC10999; ZINC8214634; Tox21_200111; (9Z)-9-Octadecen-1-ol, 85%; 7025AA; LMFA05000213; NSC-10999; Oleyl alcohol, technical grade, 85%; AKOS004910411; Oleyl alcohol, technic l, ~60% (GC); NCGC00164365-01; NCGC00164365-02; NCGC00257665-01; AK114224; AN-23262; CAS-143-28-2; CC-33316; LS-97766; SC-19456; AX8146171; DB-007794; FT-0081274; O0058; D05245; UNII-13F4MW8Y9K component ALSTYHKOOCGGFT-KTKRTIGZSA-N; UNII-CH428W5O62 component ALSTYHKOOCGGFT-KTKRTIGZSA-N; UNII-UDR641JW8W component ALSTYHKOOCGGFT-KTKRTIGZSA-N; 3164D881-7E14-4979-9E60-58DDC0468323; Oleyl alcohol, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard; oleil alkol; oleyil alkol; oleıl alkol; oley alkol; oly alkol; oleil ketil alkol; oleyl ketil alkol; oleyl ketıl alkol; oleyl ketıl alkol; ketil alkol; ketıl alkol; cetyl alkol; cety alkol; cetyl alkol; oleil ketil alkol; oleyl ketıl alkol; (Cetyl/oleyl) alcohol; polyglycol ether; poliglikol eter; poliglukol eter; polıglukol eter; polıglikol eter; polıy glikol eter; glikol ether; glukol eter; poli glikol eter; poli glukol eter; polüglıkol eter; HD-ETANOL; oleyl alkol; oleil alkohol; oleyl alkohol; oleyl alcol; oleil alcol; OLEYL ALKOL; cis-9-oktadesen-1-ol; (Z) -oktad k-9-en-1-ol 143-28-2; Oleik alkol; Oleo alkol; (Z) -9-oktadesen-1-ol; Oleoil alkol; Zeytin alkolü; HD oleyil alkol CG; cis-9-Octadesenil alkol; (Z) -oktadek-9-enol; HD oleyl alkolü 70/75; HD oleyl alkolü 80/85; HD oleyl alkolü 90/95; Oktadek-9Z-enol; (9Z) -9-oktadesen-1-ol; Oleyil alkol (NF); Oleyil alkol [NF]; Z-9-dodesen-1-ot; (Z) -9-oktadekenol; 9-oktadesen-1-ol; Oleyl alkol, ca. % 60, teknik; cis-Oleyl alkol; (Z) -oleyil alkol; OLEYL ALKOL; OLEYL/CETYL; OLEIL/CETYL; OLEİL/CETYL; OLEYL/SETİL; OLEYL/SETIL; OLEİL ALKOL; OLEİL ALCOHOL;OLEIL ALKOL; OLEIL ALCOHOL; OLEYL ALCOHOL; OLEYL ALKOL; OLEYL CETİL ALKOL; OLEYL CETIL ALKOL; OLEYL CETIL ALCOHOL; OLEYL CETİL ALCOHOL; OLEYL; OLEİL; OLEIL; CETİL; CETIL; SETİL; ALKOL; ALCOHOL; SETIL; OLEİL CETİL ALKOL; OLEIL CETİL ALKOL; OLEİL SETİL ALKOL; OLEİL SETIL ALKOL; OLEİL CETİL ALCOHOL; OLEİL CETIL ALCOHOL; OLEIL CETİL ALCOHOL; OLEIL SETİL ALCOHOL; OLEIL SETIL ALCOHOL; ALKOL; ALCOHOL; ALCOHL; SETİL ALKOL; SETIL ALKOL; SETİL ALCOHOL; SETIL ALCOHOL; CETYL ALKOL; CETYL ALCOHOL; CETİL ALKOL; CETIL ALKOL; CETIL ALCOHOL; CETİL ALCOHOL; Oleyil alkol,> =% 99 (GC); Oleyl alkol, analitik standart; Oleyl alkol, teknik sınıf,% 85; Oleyl alkol, teknik, ~% 60 (GC)


Oleyl-Cetyl alcohol polyglycolether
Emulsifiers for mineral oil.
Emulsifiers for cooling lubricants and for drilling and cutting oils.

WALLOXEN SH 20 PF
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WALLOXEN SH 55/95 PF
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WALLOXEN SP 20 PF
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WALLOXEN SP 200 PF
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WALLOXEN SP 200/70 PF
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WALLOXEN SP 300 PF
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WALLOXEN SP 50 PF
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FATTY ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATES
Manufactured in state-of-the-art reactor which is currently proven facility in India
The plant is operated under supervision of dedicated technical team who has vast experience in handling E.O, which ensures consistent quality.
Proven technology with high purity, low colour & odour meeting Indian, International specifications.
Large capacities to meet bulk requirements.
Fatty Alcohol Ethoxylates mainly find application as cleaning & scouring agents, detergents and emulsifying in textile and other industries.
Tridecyl Alcohol Ethoxylates : 3 to 12 moles under brand name of SBTX series.
Lauryl Alcohol Ethoxylates are used as a major raw material for manufacture of Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulphate (SLES) for shampoo and detergent.
Ceto Stearyl Alcohol Ethoxylates find application as an emulsifier in Pharma & Cosmetic applications such as ointments and creams
Product Range : Lauryl Alcohol Ethoxylates - 2.0 to 23 moles under brand name of SBLX series and Ceto Stearyl Alcohol Ethoxylates - 10, 20 moles under brand name of SBCTX series
We can tailor make specific moles & products as per customer requirements


Oleyl cetyl alcohol (50/55) ethoxylates
Matangi > Performance chemicals > Oleyl cetyl alcohol (50/55) ethoxylates
Product Code Appearance @ 25º C Sp.Gr. Hydroxyl Value PH (5%) HLB Active
NPE-2 Pale Yellow 0.94-0.96 177±5 6.0-8.0 5.82 100%
NPE-2 Pale Yellow 0.94-0.96 177±5 6.0-8.0 5.82 100%
NPE-2 Pale Yellow 0.94-0.96 177±5 6.0-8.0 5.82 100%
Application:

Used as water soluble general purpose detergents, wetting agents, emulsifiers dispersing agents. Find wide uses in rubber, metal working, electroplating, building industry, anti-dusting and others.


Oleyl alcohol
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Oleyl alcohol
Oleyl alcohol Structural Formula V1.svg
Names
IUPAC name
(Z)-Octadec-9-en-1-ol
Other names
Octadecenol
cis-9-Octadecen-1-ol
Identifiers
CAS Number
143-28-2
3D model (JSmol)
Interactive image
ChEBI
CHEBI:73504
ChemSpider
4447562
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.089
KEGG
D05245
PubChem CID
5284499
UNII
172F2WN8DV
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
DTXSID0022010 Edit this at Wikidata
InChI
SMILES
Properties
Chemical formula
C18H36O
Molar mass 268.478 g/mol
Density 0.845-0.855 g/cm3
Melting point 13 to 19 °C (55 to 66 °F; 286 to 292 K)
Boiling point 330 to 360 °C (626 to 680 °F; 603 to 633 K)
Solubility in water
Insoluble
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
NFPA 704 four-colored diamond
010
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒ verify (what is ☑☒ ?)
Infobox references
Oleyl alcohol /ˈoʊliˌɪl, ˈoʊliəl/,[1] octadecenol /ˌɒktəˈdɛsɪˌnɒl/, or cis-9-octadecen-1-ol, is an unsaturated fatty alcohol with the molecular formula C18H36O or the condensed structural formula CH3(CH2)7-CH=CH-(CH2)8OH. It is a colorless oil, mainly used in cosmetics.[2]

It can be produced by the hydrogenation of oleic acid esters by Bouveault-Blanc reduction, which avoids reduction of the C=C group (as would occur with usual catalytic hydrogenation). The required oleate esters are obtained from beef fat, fish oil, and, in particular, olive oil (from which it gains its name). The original procedure was reported by Louis Bouveault in 1904[3] and subsequently refined.[4][5]

It has uses as a nonionic surfactant, emulsifier, emollient and thickener in skin creams, lotions and many other cosmetic products including shampoos and hair conditioners. It has also been investigated as a carrier for delivering medications through the skin or mucus membranes; particularly the lungs.[6]

See also
Oleic acid - the corresponding fatty acid
Oleylamine - the corresponding amine
Oleamide - the corresponding amide
References
"Oleyl" in the McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms (2003)
Noweck, Klaus; Grafahrend, Wolfgang (2006). "Fatty Alcohols". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a10_277.pub2.
Bouveault, L.; Blanc, G. (1904). "Hydrogénation des éthers des acides possédant en outre les fonctions éther-oxyde ou acétal" [Hydrogenation of the ether of the acids furthermore possessing the ether-oxide or acetal functions]. Bull. Soc. Chim. Fr. (in French). 31 (3): 1210-1213.
Reid, E. E.; Cockerille, F. O.; Meyer, J. D.; Cox, W. M.; Ruhoff, J. R. (1935). "Oleyl Alcohol". Organic Syntheses. 15: 51. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.015.0051.; Collective Volume, 2, p. 468
Adkins, Homer; Gillespie, R. H. (1935). "Oleyl alcohol". Org. Synth. 29: 51. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.015.0051.
Hussain, Alamdar; Arnold, John J.; Khan, Mansoor A.; Ahsan, Fakhrul (2004). "Absorption enhancers in pulmonary protein delivery". J. Control. Release. 94 (1): 15-24. doi:10.1016/j.jconrel.2003.10.001. PMID 14684268.

This article is within the scope of WikiProject Chemicals, a daughter project of WikiProject Chemistry, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of chemicals. To participate, help improve this article or visit the project page for details on the project.
Stub This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
I thought dictdefs got moved to the Wikictionary? LukeSurl 19:42, 10 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Only dicdefs with no potential for expansion are supposed to be moved to wiktionary. This is a real thing and has obvious potential. Kappa 23:52, 10 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol
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Specifications and uses:
- Widely demanded in paint, agro chemical, etc.
- Available in several packaging options
We are reckoned entity of this domain engaged in offering an enhanced quality Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol.
Features

Product Details
Product Description
We are reckoned entity of this domain engaged in offering an enhanced quality Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol.

Features:

Unadulterated
Optimum chemical and physical properties
Safe to use

Specifications and uses:

Widely demanded in paint, agro chemical, etc.
Available in several packaging options

Established in the year 1982, at Ahmedabad, (Gujarat, India), we "Shiv Chemicals, Ahmedabad," are counted amongst the dominant supplier, trader, wholesaler and retailer of an assorted gamut of Anthraquinone Powder, Butyl Carbitol, Mercury Metal, Dioctyl Phthalate, etc. The chemicals are sourced from the most reliable manufacture of the market, which make use of supreme grade raw material in the manufacturing process. Also, they process and formulate the chemicals using chemical compounds in accurate composition as per the international standards. Owing to purity, precise pH value and accurate chemical composition, our offered chemicals are widely demanded by our clients across the world. Our organization strives to cater to the diversified needs of the clients. The vendors use sophisticated technology for processing the product range. We are also instrumental in offering customized packaging solutions to the patrons.

Our vendors are selected on the basis of their standing in the industry, their ability to supply us quality products within the specified time and financial condition. Products supplied by our vendors are again tested by our quality analysts that they are in compliance with the standards and flawless. We are therefore in a position to meet our customers' specific requirements by offering them toxic-free, skin friendly and cost effective range of chemicals at a very nominal price. By establishing strong market research, we are in a position to understand the market scenario and are able to meet the ever ending demand of our customers. Further, with our well established and improvised warehouse, we are in a position to meet the bulk requirements of our customers.
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Product Description
Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol is a Liquid(Thick oily liquid). It is available in multiple type of packaging. Triveni Chemical is one of the leading Suppliers of Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol.
Properties:
Boiling Point: 333°C (631.4°F)
Melting Point: 13°C (55.4°F)
Storage: Keep container tightly closed.
Waste Disposal: Waste must be disposed of in accordance with federal, state and local environmental control regulations.
Flammability of the Product: May be combustible at high temperature.

Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol (80/85) Ethoxylates
Description
Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol (80/85) Ethoxylates are used as surfactants in detergent formulations both, industrial and domestic.It also used as cleaning agents, scouring agents ,wetting agents and dispersants or emulsifiers in textile formulations.

Chemical Properties
pH Value 6-7.5

Fatty Alcohol Ethoxylates
Venus manufactures a wide range of ethoxylates of C8 to C22 Fatty Alcohols like Lauryl Alcohol, Cetostearyl Alcohol, Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol, Behenyl Alcohol, Stearyl Behenyl Alcohol, Stearyl Alcohol, etc.

Fatty Alcohol Ethoxylates have many uses, primarily as surfactants in detergent formulations both, industrial & domestic. These are also used as cleaning agents, scouring agents ,wetting agents & dispersants or emulsifiers in textile formulations.

Also these are used as emulsifiers, solubalizers in cosmetics & health care formulations. Also some of fatty alcohol ethoxylates and its blends are used as APEO free surfactants.
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OLEYL CETYL ALCOHOL(80/85) ETHOXYLATES

Product
Appearance @ 25 deg C
pH (5% aq)
Iodine Value
HLB
Acid Value
Colour (Gardner)
Active
OA-2
Clear to slightly hazy, colorless to pale yellow liquid
6.0-7.5
58 - 62
4.96
0.5
2
100%
OA-2.5
Clear to slightly hazy, colorless to pale yellow liquid
6.0-7.5
53 - 57
5.82
0.5
2
100%
OA-5
Opaque white to off white liquid
6.0-7.5
41- 46
9.01
0.5
2
100%
OA-10
White turbid liquid/ soft paste
6.0-7.5
28 - 33
12.45
0.5
2
100%
OA-15
White soft paste
6.0-7.5
18 - 22
14.22
0.5
2
100%
OA-20
White soft solid
6.0-7.5
16 -20
15.35
0.5
2
100%
OA-25
White soft solid
6.0-7.5
12 -- 17
16.08
0.5
2
100%
OA-30
White soft solid
6.0-7.5
10 -- 15
16.64
0.5
2
100%

We have marked a distinct position in the domain by putting forward a pristine quality array of Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol ethoxylates manufacturers & exporters in India to the clients within committed time frame. This chemical is widely used as an emulsifier and solvent in industries like cosmetic, pharmaceutical, textile, paper etc. This chemical is carefully processed with the aid of modern methodologies under controlled laboratory conditions by adept crew of professionals by the Manfacturer of Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol ethoxylates in India. Furthermore, this Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate can be purchased from us at regular market rates.

Key points:

Wetting agent
Easily soluble in solvents
Easy to handle
Surfactant property

The effect of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol on metabolism of some fungi and their potential application in mycoremediation

Abstract
The effect of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol at a concentration of 1% on the growth and metabolism of A. tenuis Nees and P. verrucosum Dierckx was examined in this paper. The fungal growth was investigated by monitoring the diameter of colonies on solid media and dry weight biomass in liquid media. A. tenuis had better response to applied pollutant in solid medium, whereas P. verrucosum had better response in liquid medium. During exponential fungal growth in liquid media with and without pollutant (control), the following physico-chemical and biochemical parameters were carried out: pH, quantity of free and total organic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, proteolytic activity. The ethoxylated oleyl- -cetyl alcohol had influence on decrease in pH value and increase in free organic acids of both fungi. Furthermore, it has influenced production in way that lower amount of total organic acids, proteins, glucose and fructose were gained in fermentation broth of P. verrucosum compared to A. tenuis. The proteolityc activity of fungi was partially (A. tenuis) or fully inhibited (P. verrucosum) by presence of pollutant in liquid medium. Based on the obtained results, these fungal species act as potential candidates for mycoremediation of alcohol ethoxylated contaminated environments and biotechnology. © 2016, Association of Chemists and Chemical Engineers of Serbia. All rights reserved.

The effect of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol on metabolism of some fungi and their potential application in mycoremediation
*Corresponding author: Jakovljević Violeta, Institute for Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, Radoja Domanovića 12, 34 000 Kragujevac, Serbia, tel. +381 34 336 223, fax +381 34 335 040, email: jakovljevicvioleta@gmail.com Abstract The effect of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol at a concentration of 1% on the growth and metabolism of A. tenuis Nees and P. verrucosum Dierckx was examined in this paper. The fungal growth was investigated by monitoring the diameter of colonies on solid media and dry weight biomass in liquid media. A. tenuis had better response to applied pollutant in solid medium, whereas P. verrucosum had better response in liquid medium. During exponential fungal growth in liquid media with and without pollutant (control), the following physico-chemical and biochemical parameters were carried out: pH, quantity of free and total organic acids, proteins, carbohydrates, proteolytic activity. The ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol had influence on decrease in pH value and increase in free organic acids of both fungi. Furthermore, it has influenced production in way that lower amount of total organic acids, proteins, glucose and fructose were gained in fermentation broth of P. verrucosum compared to A. tenuis. The proteolityc activity of fungi was partially (A. tenuis) or fully inhibited (P. verrucosum) by presence of pollutant in liquid medium. Based on the obtained results, these fungal species act as potential candidates for mycoremediation of alcohol ethoxylated contaminated environments and biotechnology.

TRODUCTION Ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol (Tab. 1) is surfactant from the group of fatty alcohol ethoxylates (FAEs) that are representing the most important group of non-ionic surfactants from economical point of view. FAEs are widely used in domestic and commercial detergents, household cleaners and personal care products. They are employed as wetting and washing agents in the cosmetics, agriculture, paper, oil and other sectors of processing industry. Constant increase in production volume of these non-ionic surfactants in the world over the past 20 years, especially in Europe, is conditioned by many FAEs desired characteristics, such as rapid biodegradation, low-to-moderate foaming ability, superior cleaning of man-made fibers, tolerance of water hardness and ability to perform in cold water [1]. Table 1. On the other hand, rapid growth of production alcohol ethoxylates (AEs) in the world points to the possibility of an increased quantity of this pollutant in aquatic ecosystems at concentrations above expectations. After usage, residual surfactants and their degradation
products are discharged to sewage treatment plants or directly to surface water sand sediments [2]. Experimental results from many biodegradation studies in laboratory and field conditions suggest that there is a high quantity of primary and ultimate biodegradation of these surfactants in the environment [3]. AEs are degraded biologically by wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in excess 95-99% [4, 5]. Concentration of total AEs in WWTP effluents is in the range 1.0-23 µg/l in Europe, Canada and USA [6, 7]. From the middle of ‘70s until today, several environmental risk assessments were carried out on AEs [8, 9]. These surfactants have a strong affinity for sorption to solids such as activated sludge, river water solids and, ultimately, sediments [10-12]. Level of toxicity to aquatic organisms, measured by EC50, ranges from very toxic (< 1 mg/l) to harmful (between 10-100 mg/l). Also, during the mention time period, studies related to understanding the biodegradation mechanisms of AEs in the presence of complex microbial communities were carried out using different methods. Several AEs degrading bacteria were isolated under aerobic [13] and anaerobic conditions [14, 15]. In the last two decades, bacteria were in the focus of bioremediation studies, unlike fungi which were studied much less. Mycoremediation is an innovative biotechnology that uses living fungus for in situ and ex situ cleanup and management of contaminated sites [16]. Filamentous fungi have ability to grow on wide spectrum of substrates by secreting extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, even capable of growing under ambient environment. Moreover, due to the low substrate specificity of their degradative enzyme machinery, fungi are able to perform the breakdown of a wide range of organic and xenobiotic pollutants: petroleum hydrocarbons, chlorophenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins and furans, pesticides, herbicides and nitroaromatic explosives [17, 18]. These fungal properties are utilized in a variety of processes (biological control agent, biobleaching, bioremediation, waste treatment).
Based on our previous researches [19-22], it was identified that several species of fungi such as A. niger, T. roseum, F. oxysporum, etc., can grow and metabolize ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol at a wide concentration range 0.01-1%. For this reason, current study was conceptualized in order to investigate the effect of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol at a concentration of 1% on the growth of selected fungi and changes of their metabolic activity. Isolation and identification of fungi from aquatic ecosystems that are resistant to the presence of high concentrations of this pollutant on the one hand, and the effect of a pollutant on their metabolism on the other hand, are crucial parameters for application of fungi in mycoremediation. EXPERIMENTAL Isolation and identification of fungi from wastewater The fungi applied in this study were isolated from the sample of wastewater river basin of Lepenica, Kragujevac (the place of wastewater flood, sewage). The sample of water was taken in a sterile container. The sample was transferred to the microbiology laboratory and was afterwards inoculated onto Petri plate's nutrient malt agar with streptomycin (in duplicates). The Petri plates were then incubated for 5-7 days at standard temperature (28±2)°C. Pure cultures were obtained by the method of exhausting on poor malt agar plates and potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates. Identification of the fungi was based primarily on the macroscopic and microscopic morphology and was carried out by Systematic keys at the Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Serbia. The fungi selected as test organisms in this study were: Alternaria tenuis Nees (1817) and Penicillium verrucosum Dierckx (1913). The fungi were maintained on PDA plates, stored at (4±0.5)°C and sub-cultured monthly in sterile conditions. Inoculums suspensions were prepared from fresh, mature (from 3- to 5-day-old) cultures grown on PDA plates. The colonies were covered with 5 ml of distilled sterile water. The inoculums were achieved by carefully rubbing the colonies with a sterile loop; the isolates were shaken vigorously for 15 s with a Vortex mixer and then transferred to a sterile tube. The inoculums sizes were adjusted to 1.0×106 spores/ml by microscopic enumeration with a cell-counting hematocytometer (Neubauer chamber). Cultivation of fungi on solid media and culture condition The Czapek Dox's solid media was prepared according to the formulation shown in Table 2, with addition of 20 g agar-agar and autoclaved at 121°C for 20 min (autoclave pressure, 0.14 MPa). After cooling to 45ºC, culture media were dispensed into sterile Petri dishes for solidification. The tested fungi were inoculated at the center of the agar plates. The plates were incubated at room temperature over 8 days, in order to examine the exponential growth of fungi. Table 2. Growth medium Mark c (g/l) NaNO3 K2HPO4 MgSO4 x7H2O FeSO4 x7H2O Sucrose AOCa Control C 3 1 0.5 0.01 30 C + 1 % AOC AOC 3 1 0.5 0.01 30 10 aAOC - Ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol (Henkel, Krusevac) Cultivation of fungi in liquid media and culture condition The Czapek Dox's liquid growth media (100 ml) was prepared in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask, according to procedure mentioned above, but without addition of agar. One ml spore suspension of both fungi was inoculated in liquid media. Following inoculation, Erlenmeyer flasks were placed on an orbital shaker (Kinetor-m, Ljubljana) thus enabling uniform and constant mixing. All Erlenmeyer flasks were incubated at room temperature, under alternate
light and dark for 8 days. Sampling has begun on day 4 and repeated daily until the end of experiment. All experiments were conducted in triplicate. Measurement of pH values A pH value of the fermentation broth (initial pH value about 5.0) in the experiment was measured by a pH meter (type MA-5705, the product "Iskra", Kranj) during fungal growth from day 4 to day 8. Determination of colony diameters Colony diameters (CD) were measured with a ruler at intervals of 24 h from inoculation until day 8. The growth curves were constructed from the diameter of the colonies (cm) versus incubation time (day). From the growth curves, the exponential growth phases of fungi were determined in the period of cultivation from day 4 to day 8. This period was selected for further study of physico-chemical and biochemical parameters of fungi in liquid growth media. Determination of dry weight biomass The 8-day-old mycelia was separated from the fermentation broth by filtration through pre-weighed filter paper. The mycelia was washed with distilled water several times. Filter papers with mycelia were dried in an oven at 80°C to constant weight. The dry weight of the mycelia was calculated by subtracting the initial weight of the filter paper from the weight of mycelia and filter paper. The results are presented as grams per liter (g/l). Determination of concentrations total and free organic acids The concentration of free and total organic acids (FOA and TOA) was determined by ion exchange chromatography according to method by Bullen et al. [23], as described in greater detail in our previous work [20]. The results are presented as percentages (%). Determination of monosaccharides quantity
The quantity of monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, were also determined by ion exchange chromatography according to procedure which is discribed in our previous work [21]. The results are presented as percentages (%). Determination of protein concentration Protein concentration in fermentation broth of fungi was determined according to the method by Kjeldahl [24]. A sample was digested with a strong acid so that it releases nitrogen, which was determined by a suitable titration technique. A conversion factor of 6.25 (equivalent to 0.16 g nitrogen per gram of protein) was used for calculating the quantity of protein, according to the Eq. (1): The quantity of proteins (mg) = 6.25 x quantity of nitrogen (1) Assays of alkaline protease activity (EC 3.4.21-24) The assay of alkaline protease was carried out by Anson's method [25]. Reaction mixture, which contained 5 ml of casein and 1 ml fermentation broth, was incubated at 37ºC for 30 minutes. The reaction was stopped by adding 1 ml of 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The mixture was centrifuged at 4.000 rpm/min and then 5 ml of 6% Na2CO3 and 1 ml diluted Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol reagent were added to supernatant. The solution was kept at room temperature for 30 min and absorbance was read at 660 nm using tyrosine standard. One unite of alkaline protease activity was defined as the amount of enzyme capable of producing 1µg of tyrosine from casein in a minute under assay condition. Statistical analysis The results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation of data obtained from three independent measurements. The database was analyzed using the Software Package for Social Science for Windows 14.0 (SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL). RESULTS AND DISSCUSION
Our previous studies emphasize that some fungi species which originated from wastewater can metabolize the detergent components (e.g. ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol and sodium tripolyphosphate) for growth and biomass accumulation [19-22]. Having this in mind, this study was designated in order to investigate the influence of ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol, which is added to nutrient medium in a high concentration (1%) on the growth, development and metabolic activity of A. tenuis Nees and P. verrucosum Dierckx. The obtained results should serve as a theoretical basis for practical application of tested fungi in mycoremediation of environment. Research results of this study are presented in Fig 1, and Tabs 3 and 4. The effect of surfactant on fungal growth on solid medium Chemical composition of Czapek Dox's nutrient medium has optimal properties for growth and high biomass production of numerous fungi [19-22, 26]. In addition, the presence of various pollutants (e.g. dye, heavy metals, pesticides, surfactants) in the culture medium may have an inhibitory or stimulatory effect on the fungal growth depending on type and applied concentration of pollutant, and the fungal species. For testing of fungal growth, the fungi were grown previously on solid media with (AOC) and without pollutant (C) over a period of 8 days. The colonies diameters were measured daily and growth curves were constructed. For both fungi, the exponential growth phase occurred in the period of cultivation from day 4 to day 8 (Fig. 1). As Fig. 1 shows, CD of A. tenuis had gradually increased on C medium, from day 4 to day 8, whereas P. verrucosum had a lower growth rate compared to A. tenuis. Different growth rates between the tested fungi in C medium can be explained by their morph-physiological differences that affect different response for the adoption and nutrient transport. When fungi were grown on solid medium with addition of AOC, they had lower CD compared to the control. The growth of A. tenuis on AOC medium was significantly (p<0.01) or slightly inhibited on day 4 and from day 7 to day 8,
respectively. These results can be explained by a period of fungal adaptation to the presence of AOC in medium, during the initial stage of growth, as well as the creation of some degradation products that slow down fungal growth. Ethoxylated alcohol showed an inhibitory effect on CD of P. verrucosum over a period of three days (from day 5 to day 8), but had no influence on fungal growth on day 4. Obviously, the fungus P. verrucosum is more tolerant to a high concentration of the AOC in medium than A. tenuis, considering its CD was two times higher that CD of A. tenuis on day 4. However, the AOC degradation products had a higher intoxicating effect on the growth of P. verrucosum than parent molecule. Consequently, CD of P. verrucosum was significantly lower (14.29%) on day 8, whereas CD of A. tenuis was lower only by 3% compared to the control. Figure 1. The effect of surfactant on fungal growth in liquid medium The DW biomass of tested fungi grown in the liquid Czapek Dox's media was measured on day 8 (at the end of exponential growth) and results are presented in Table 3. The fungus A. tenuis had higher DW biomass (0.55 g/l) than fungus P. verrucosum (0.17 g/l) in C medium. On the other hand, AOC added in liquid medium showed strong inhibitory effect (67%) on DW biomass of A. tenuis and mildly stimulating effect (13.5%) on DW biomass of P. verrucosum, compared to control. The finding that fungi could survive and grow in solid and liquid Czapek Dox's media with AOC at a high concentration (1%) provided evidence for the fungal resistance to this pollutant. The different response of fungi to growth on solid and liquid media with AOC was also confirmed in this study. Therefore, A. tenuis had better response to presence of AOC in solid medium, whereas P. verrucosum had better response to presence of AOC in liquid medium. These characteristics of fungi make them utilizable in bioremediation of solid and liquid environments. The obtained results are consistent with the results of our previous studies, which revealed the influence of AOC
on the DW biomass of fungi T. roseum, F. oxysporum and A. niger. Therefore, this pollutant has a mild stimulating effect on the biomass of T. roseum and F. oxysporum but has a very strong inhibitory effect on the biomass of A. niger, under the same experimental conditions [21, 22]. Table 3. The influence of surfactant on pH media Transport of nutrients through the cell membranes and growth of microorganisms are closely related with ambient pHs. Although, most fungal species live in a wide range of external pH, they proliferate more rapidly at acidic pH. When grown in an unbuffered medium, filamentous fungi often rapidly acidify their environment to very low and even sometimes detrimental pH values [27]. The major mechanism behind this acidification is controversially discussed, although it is most often attributed to either organic acid excretion [27, 28] or proton release by the plasma membrane H-ATPase [29]. The addition of some organic molecules (e.g. AOC, sodium tripolyphosphate or commercial detergent) in nutrient medium influences the change of pH values towards an alkaline environment that can be considered as a stress condition. According to literature, fungal response to alkaline pH is based on two possible mechanisms. First is the proteolytic activation of PacC transcription factors (A. nidulans, C. albicans, S. cerevisiae, Y. lipolytica) [30] and second mechanism is existence of the calcium-mediated pathway [31]. This study has evaluated the changes of pH value of fermentation broth during fungal growth from day 4 to day 8, as Table 3 shows. The pH values of liquid control media (C) were closely related and in neutral range (P. verrucosum 7.12 units, A. tenuis 7.14 units) on day 4. During the growth of fungi, the pH values of C media were changed to different intensity, depending on the fungal species. Therefore, during those four days, the pH value of C medium of P. verrucosum was gradually decreasing and the largest decrease in pH value
(0.17 units) was measured from day 5 to day 6. On the contrary, the changes of pH value of C medium of A. tenuis were slightly increasing from day 4 to day 6. From that point on, the pH value was then decreasing with the almost same intensity until day 8. The presence of AOC at a concentration of 1% in a liquid media resulted in pH changes of media. The pH value of AOC medium of A. tenuis was insignificantly lower on day 4, whereas the pH value of P. verrucosum was significantly higher as compared to control. During the growth of P. verrucosum, pH value of AOC medium was decreasing, and the largest decrease in pH value (0.24 units) was observed from day 5 to day 6. On the contrary, the pH values of AOC medium of A. tenuis changed in the opposite manner, but the changes were very small. Decreasing of media pH is widespread phenomenon observed during extensive mycelium development of many fungal species such as A. niger, F. oxysporum, P. chrysogenum, etc. The results obtained in this study evidently suggest that fungi probably have different mechanism regulation of external pH, which depends on numerous factors (e.g. pH value, chemical composition of medium, fungal morphology, etc.). Activity of alkaline protease (EC 3.4.21-24) in liquid media Proteases are degradative enzymes, which catalyze the cleavage of peptide bonds in proteins. They have wide-ranging applications in industrial products and processes such as detergent, food, pharmaceuticals, tannery, waste treatments, etc. In literature, several microbial strains including fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium graminarum, Penicillium griseofulvin, etc.) and bacteria (Bacillus licheniformis, B. firmus, B. subtilis, etc.), are reported to produce protease. Due to these facts, the alkaline protease activity of A. tenuis and P. verrucosum was evaluated in this paper. Data presented in Table 3 has shown that tested fungi produced extracellular protease when grown in C medium more effectively than in AOC medium. The proteolytic activity of fungi was increased parallel with the fungal growth (A. tenuis and P. verrucosum) in C
medium, from day 4 to day 6. The maximum proteolytic activity was measured in the fermentation broth of A. tenuis (0.63 mg/ml) on day 6. Fungus P. verrucosum had two times lower proteolytic activity in same medium, with its maximum (0.35 mg/ml) achieved on day 6. Addition of ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol, in liquid nutrient medium at a concentration of 1%, contributed to a partial (A. tenuis) or complete inhibition (P. verrucosum) of proteolytic activity, during fungal growth. Proteolytic activity of A. tenuis in AOC medium was expressed on day 4 and from day 6 to day 8, with its maximum (0.400 mg/ml) achieved on day 8. In the presence of AOC, fungal proteolytic activity was inhibited about 37% (or remained about 63% activity) in relation to control. Obviously, various morpho-physiological characteristics of the fungi and some degradation products of AOC in medium have caused differences in effects of this pollutant on proteolytic activity. These results are also supported by the findings of Stojanović et al. [22] who reported that AOC at concentration of 1% has a strong inhibitory effect on the activity of proteolytic enzymes the fungus T. roseum. However, the same authors also reported that the AOC at concentration of 1% has a strong stimulating effect on the proteolytic activity of A. niger, under the same experimental conditions [19]. According to Evans and Abdullahi [32], surfactants may have improved the permeability of the cell membrane through disruption of lipid bilayer thereby increasing the uptake of nutrient into the organism and the secretion of enzyme into the culture medium. Non-ionic surfactants type of ethylene oxides, bind to active site of enzymes through hydrogen bonds in order to enhance conformation flexibility [33]. Zeng et al. [34] revealed that incorporation of Tween-80 into fermentation medium have shown to enhance production and secretion of protease. Li et al. [35] demonstrated that Tween-80 and acetonitril increased the yield of protease activity of Serratia sp. SYBC H by 5.0 and 4.3 folds, respectively. Maruthiah et al. [36] has reported enhanced protease activity of Bacillus flexus by non-ionic surfactant Tween-20, Tween-40, Tween-60 and Triton X-100. According to Barberis et al.
[37], proteolytic activity of araujiain increased or remained constant while non-ionic surfactant concentration was being increased (0.1%, 0.4% and 1%). Enzyme stability in the presence of detergent ingredients, such as surfactants, builders and activated bleach, etc.; optimum activity at alkaline pH; effectiveness at low wash temperatures of 20-40ºC; are very important properties for its use in detergent formulations [38]. Based on presented results and facts mentioned above, performances of A. tenuis alkaline protease are suitable for its potential application as an additive in laundry detergent formulations ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol type. Production of protein in liquid media Numerous studies оf protein secretion has been made with filamentous fungi but the molecular basis for the protein secretion in fungi is still lacking. Bearing that in mind, the fungi were referred as "a highly productive black box" by Peberdy [39]. Therefore, the examination of protein secretion of each fungal species in various media is very important. The tested fungi had produced a different amount of protein in C medium on day 4, and it was ranged from 0.10 mg/ml (A. tenuis) to 0.67 mg/ml (P. verrucosum) (Tab. 4). The amount of proteins secreted in this medium was increased parallel with the fungal growth. Fungus A. tenuis has secreted the highest amount of protein (0.72 mg/ml) on day 6, and P. verrucosum (1.80 mg/ml) on day 8. Ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol added in the culture medium seems to have slightly stimulated the proteins secretion of A. tenuis (0.76 mg/ml), whereas it strongly inhibited the proteins secretion of P. verrucosum (0.21 mg/ml). The least deviation in the secretion of proteins between the media was found by A. tenuis. Data that was found in the literature confirmed inhibitory/stimulatory effect of AOC at a concentration of 1% on protein production of T. roseum [22], and A. niger and F. oxysporum [19, 21]. The results of this study as well as results of mentioned authors are evidently indicating that fungal morphology is also directly correlated with protein production.
Table 4. The influence of surfactant on organic acids excretion The tested fungi excreted different amount of FOAs and TOAs depending on the type of medium and culture age (Tab. 4). The amount of FOAs measured in C medium was significantly higher (P. verrucosum) or low (A. tenuis) on day 8, compared to day 4. During the same cultivation period, AOC at a concentration of 1% showed strong stimulatory effect on FOAs excretion of both fungi, in relation to control. To summarize, the fungus P. verrucosum excreted about 1.5-fold larger amount of FOAs and A. tenuis excreted about 7-fold larger amount of FOAs in AOC medium in relation to control. The amount of TOAs measured in fermentation broth of C medium of A. tenuis was significantly lower or, as in the case of P. verrucosum, significantly higher on day 8 than on day 4. The AOC added in medium with a concentration of 1% has influenced TOAs amount in both fungi by increasing it significantly on day 8 compared to day 4. Generally, A. tenuis excreted higher amount of TOAs in both culture media than P. verrucosum. These results provide evidence that significant differences exist between the tested fungi in organic acids excretion in both media. Decreasing of pH media of P. verrucosum is in positive correlation with increasing of organic acids excretion. In contrast, increasing of pH control medium of A. tenuis is in negative correlation with amount of organic acids excreted, which could be explained with a reuptake of organic acids. Therefore, organic acids excreted in media are serving another purpose (charge balance, energy spilling or chelation of trace elements) besides acidification of external medium. The influence of surfactant on amount of monosaccharides Monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, are the reducing sugars produced by the action of invertase on sucrose. Generally, when sucrose is used as an only carbon source, the fungus utilizes rather glucose than fructose for its metabolism [40]. Sucrose is necessary in
medium with AOC for fungal biodegradation of pollutant. Taking this into consideration, the effect of AOC on amount of monosaccharides was investigated in this study. The concentration of glucose and fructose in the fermentation broth of fungi was determined at the beginning (day 4) and at the end of exponential growth phase (day 8), as Table 4 shows. On day 4, very small amount of glucose and fructose was measured in C medium of P. verrucosum but significant amount of monosaccharides was measured in C medium of A. tenuis. Regardless of these differences, both fungi produced lower amount of fructose than glucose, which means that fungi metabolized fructose rather than glucose in medium with sucrose as only carbon source. These results are opposite from results of above-mentioned authors. Obviously, parameters such as fungal morphology and experimental conditions (pH medium, chemical composition of medium, aeration, etc.), have influenced monosaccharides uptake rates. At the same time, very low amount of glucose and fructose was also measured in both AOC media. In this medium, fungi metabolized equal amount of monosaccharides. On day 8, the amount of glucose and fructose measured in C medium of P. verrucosum was significantly higher than on day 4. Nevertheless, the amount of glucose and fructose in same medium of A. tenuis was lower, especially glucose. In both AOC media, amount of monosaccharides was higher on day 8 compared to day 4. Accordingly, A. tenuis produced about 0.71% glucose and 0.44% fructose, whereas P. verrucosum produced about 0.18% glucose and 0.35% fructose. These results indicate that tested fungi have different flux for monosaccharides in presence of AOC. Therefore, A. tenuis utilizes fructose rather than glucose, whereas P. verrucosum rather utilizes glucose in medium with AOC. Results obtained in this study are in accordance with report by Stojanović et al., [22] who found that ethoxylated alcohol stimulates the production of glucose of F. oxysporum and fructose of T. roseum and F. oxysporum. However, the same authors confirmed the inhibitory effect of this pollutant on production of monosaccharides in experiment with A. niger [21]. The differences
in the fungal utilization of glucose and fructose observed in this study could be caused either by differences in the transport systems or by the subsequent intracellular metabolism of the sugars. Also, AOC could influence synthesis of inducible enzymes involved in regulation of carbohydrates metabolism or some of its degradation products have a role of competitive inhibitor of these enzymes. CONCLUSIONS Based on obtained results, ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol at a concentration of 1% had different effect on the growth, development and metabolic activity of the tested fungi, depending on the species of fungi. Both fungi species could survive and grow in solid and liquid Capek Dox's medium with addition of AOC at a high concentration (1%). The A. tenuis has better response to AOC on solid medium whereas P. verrucosum has better response to AOC in liquid medium. Ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol has influenced metabolic activity of fungi in direction of production of significant amount of organic acids, proteins, fructose (P. verrucosum) and glucose (A. tenuis). The alkaline protease activity of fungus A. tenuis had retained about 63.50% activity in the presence of AOC, so it could have a potential application in detergent formulation. The results presented in this study undoubtedly indicate the possible application of the tested fungi in both mycoremediation of contaminated solid and liquid environments and in different areas of industries. Acknowledgments This research was financially supported by Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant numbers III 43004). REFERENCES [1] HERA, Human & Environmental Risk Assessment on ingredients of European household cleaning products, Alcohol Ethoxylates, 2009. http://www.heraproject.com
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Humic substances and chemical contaminants, Madison, WI: Soil Science Society of America, 2001, pp. 177-86. [11] L. Zhu, K. Yang, B. Lou, B. Yuan, A multi-component statistic analysis for the influence of sediment/soil composition on the sorption of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-100) onto sediments/soils, Water Res. 37 (2003) 4792-4800. [12] S.M. Mudge, P.C. De Leo, S.D. Dyer, Quantifying the anthropogenic fraction of fatty alcohols in a terrestrial environment, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 31 (2012) 1209-1222. [13] E.C. Tidswell, N.J. Russell, G.F. White, Ether-bond scission in the biodegradation of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants by Pseudomonas sp. strain SC25A, Microbiology 142 (1996) 1123-1131. [14] M.A. Grant, W.J. Payne, Anaerobic growth of Alcaligenes faecalis var. denitrificans at the expense of ether glycols and nonionic detergents, Biotechnol. Bioeng.25 (1983) 627-630. [15] S. Wagener, B. Schink, Fermentative degradation of nonionic surfactants and polyethylene glycol by enrichment cultures and by pure cultures of homoacetogenic and propionate-forming bacteria, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54 (1988) 561-565. [16] R. Ramachandran, J.J. Gnanadoss, Mycoremediation for the treatment of dye containing effluents, IJCOA 2 (2013) 286-293. [17] A.L. Juhasz, R. Naidu, Bioremediation of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: a review of the microbial degradation of benzo[a]pyrene, Int. Biodeter. Biodegr. 45 (2000) 57-88. [18] M.L. Rabinovich, A.V. Bolobova, L.G. Vasilchenko, Decomposition of natural aromatic structures and xenobiotics by fungi, Appl. Biochem. Microbiol. 40 (2004) 5-23.
[19] J. Stojanović, М. Grbavcić, A. Cosović, M. Stojanović, The influence of detergent, the active component of detergent and sodium tripolyphosphate on the biochemical process of some fungi, Riv. Biol. 97 (2004) 329-39. [20] J. Stojanović, V. Jakovljević, I. Matović, Z. Mijušković, T. Nedeljković, The influence of detergent, sodium tripoly-phosphates and ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol on metabolism of the fungi Penicillium verrucosum Peyronel, Acta Vet-Beograd 60 (2010) 67-77. [21] J. Stojanović, V. Jakovljević, I. Matović, O. Gajović, Z. Mijušković, T. Nedeljković, Influence of detergent on metabolic activity of fungi Aspergillus niger, Natural Science 3 (2011) 466-470. [22] J. Stojanović, J. Milićević, O. Gajović, V. Jakovljević, I. Matović, Z. Mijušković, T. Nedeljković, The effects of detergent, sodium tripoly-phosphate and ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol on metabolic parameters of the fungus Trichothecium roseum Link, Arch. Biol. Sci. 63 (2011) 1001-1006. [23] W.A. Bulen, J.E. Varner, R.C. Burrell, Separation of Organic Acids from Plant Tissues, Anal. Chem. 24 (1952) 187-190. [24] J.T. Kjeldahl, Neue Methode zur Bestimmung des Stickstoffs in organischen Körpern, Z. Anal. Chem. 22 (1883) 366-382. [25] M.L. Anson, The estimation of pepsin, trypsin, papain, and cathepsin with hemoglobin, J. Gen. Physiol. 22 (1938) 79-89. [26] V.D. Jakovljević, J.M. Milićević, J.D. Stojanović, S.R. Solujić, M.M. Vrvić, Influence of detergent and its components on metabolism of Fusarium oxysporum in submerged fermentation. Hem. Ind. 68 (2014) 465-473.
[27] J.K. Magnuson, L.L. Lasure, In: J.S. Tkacz, L. Lange (Eds.), Organic acid production by filamentous fungi. Advances in Fungal Biotechnology for Industry, Agriculture, and Medicine, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, 2004, pp. 307-340. [28] M.R. Andersen, L. Lehmann, J. Nielsen, Systemic analysis of the response of Aspergillus niger to ambient pH, Genome Biol. 10 (2009) R47. [29] K. Jernejc, M. Legisa, Activation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase by ammonium ions in Aspergillus niger, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 57 (2001) 368-373. [30] W. Li, A.P. Mitchell, Proteolytic activation of Rim1p; a positive regulator of yeast sporulation and invasive growth, Genetics 145 (1997) 63-73. [31] R. Serrano, A. Ruiz, D. Bernal, J.R. Chambers, J. Ariño, The transcriptional response to alkaline pH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence for calcium-mediated signaling, Mol. Microbiol. 46 (2002) 1319-33. [32] E.C. Evans, A. Abdullahi, Effect of surfactant inclusions on the yield and characteristics of protease from Bacillus subtilis, Proc. Rom. Acad. Series B 2 (2012) 108-112. [33] S.Ž. Grbavčić, D.I. Bezbradica, I.M. Karadžic, Z.D. Kneževic-Jugovic, Lipases and proteases produced by indigenous Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain as potential detergent additives, Hem. Ind. 63 (2009) 331-335. [34] G.-M. Zeng, J.-G. Shi, X.-Z. Yuan, J. Liu, Z.-B. Zhang, G.-H. Huang, J.-B. Li, B.-D. Xi, H.-L. Liu, Effects of Tween 80 and rhamnolipid on the extracellular enzymes of Penicillium simplicissimum isolated from compost, Enzyme Microb. Technol. 39 (2006) 1451-1456. [35] G.Y. Li, Y.J. Cai, X.R. Liao, A novel nonionic surfactant- and solvent-stable alkaline serine protease from Serratia sp. SYBC H with duckweed as nitrogen source: production, purification, characteristics and application, J. Ind. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 38 (2011) 845-53.
[36] T. Maruthiah, P. Esakkiraj, G. Immanuel, A. Palavesam, Alkaline serine protease from marine Bacillus flexus APCMST-RS2P: purification and characterization, Curr. Biotechnol. 3 (2014) 238-243. [37] S. Barberis, E. Quiroga, C. Barcia, C. Liggieri, Effect of laundry detergent formulation on the performance of alkaline phytoproteases, Electron. J. Biotechn. 16 (2013) 1-8. http://dx.doi.org/10.2225/vol16-issue3-fulltext-1 [38] E. Smulders, W. Rähse, W. Von Rybinski, J. Steber, E. Sung, F. Wiebel, In: E. Smulders (Ed.), Detergent ingredient. Laundry detergent, Wiley-VCH, Verlag GmbH & CoKGaA, Germani, 2002, pp. 38-98. [39] J.F. Peberdy, Protein secretion in filamentous fungi-trying to understand a highly productive black box, Trends Biotechnol. 12 (1994) 50-57. [40] E. Peynaud, S. Domercq, Sur les espbces de levures fermentant selectivement le fructose, Annales de I'lnstitut Pasteur, 89 (1955) 346-351. (in France)
Izvod Uticaj etoksilovanog oleil-cetil alkohola na metabolizam nekih gljiva i njihova potencijalna primena u mikoremedijaciji Violeta D. Jakovljević1*i Miroslav M. Vrvić2 1Institut za biologiju i ekologiju, Prirodno-matematički fakultet, Univerzitet u Kragujevcu, Radoja Domanovića 12, 34 000 Kragujevac, Srbija 2Departman za Biohemiju, Hemijski fakultet, Univerzitet u Beogradu, Studentski trg 12-16, 11 000 Beograd, Srbija (Naučni rad) Uticaj etoksivanog oleil-cetil alkohola 1% koncentracije na metabolizam gljiva A. tenuis Nees and P. verrucosum Dierckx, koje su izolovane iz otpadnih kanalizacionih voda, bio je predmet istraživanja ove studije. Dejstvo 1% etoksivanog oleil-cetil alkohola na rast gljiva ispitivano je praćenjem prečnika kolonija na čvrstoj i merenjem suve biomase micelija u tečnoj Čapekovoj podlozi. Gljiva A. tenuis imala je bolji odgovor na prisustvo polutanta u čvrstoj podlozi dok je P. verrucosum ispoljila bolji odgovor na polutant u tečnoj podlozi. Tokom eksponencijalnog rasta gljiva u tečnoj podlozi sa i bez navedenog polutanta (kontrola), praćene su promene sledećih fizičko-hemijskih i biohemijskih parametara: pH, količina: slobodnih i ukupnih organskih kiselina, proteina i ugljenih hidrata, proteolitička aktivnost. Etoksilovani oleil-cetil alkohol uticao je na smanjenje pH vrednosti podloge i povećanje količine slobodnih organskih kiselina obe gljive. Pomenuti polutant uticao je na
produkciju manje količine ukupnih organskih kiseline, proteina, glukoze i fruktoze, u fermentacionoj tečnosti gljive P. verrucosum u odnosu na A. tenuis. Proteolitička aktivnost gljiva bila je delimično (A. tenuis) ili potpuno inhibirana (P. verrucosum) prisustvom polutanta u tečnoj hranljivoj podlozi. U prisustvu 1% etoksilovanog oleil-cetil alkohola alkalna proteaza A. tenuis zadržala je oko 67% aktivnosti tako da bi se mogla koristiti kao aditiv u formulaciji deterdženta. Na osnovu dobijenih rezultata može se zaključiti da se testirane gljive mogu smatrati potencijalnim kandidatima za mikoremedijaciju životne sredine (zemljišta, voda) kontaminirane alkoholnim etoksilatima. Ključne reči: monosaharidi, organske kiseline, prečnik kolonije, proteini, proteolitička aktivnost, suva biomasa
Figure and Table captions Figure 1. The colonies diameter of A. tenuis and P. verrucosum during exponential growth on solid media (C-control, AOC-medium with 1% ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol) Table 1. Chemical structure surfactant Table 2. Composition of growth media in 1000 ml distillated water Table 3. Total dry weight of biomass, pH value and proteolitic activity of fungi in liquid media (C-control, AOC-medium with 1% ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol) Table 4. Quantity of proteins, free and total organic acids and monosaccharides (glucose and fructose) in liquid media (C-control, AOC-medium with 1% ethoxylated oleyl-cetyl alcohol)
OLEYL CETYL ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE - OLEYL CETYL (50/55) ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE

RIMPRO Appearance at
25°C PH
Value Iodine
Value HLB Acid Value Max Colour
(Gardner)
Max
OCA-2 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 36-40 5.19 0.5 150
OCA-2.5 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 34-38 6.01 0.5 150
OCA-5 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 25-29 9.25 0.5 150
OCA-6.5 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 22-26 10.57 0.5 150
OCA-10 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 17-21 12.67 0.5 150
OCA-15 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 12-16 12.67 0.5 150
OCA-20 White waxy solid 6.0 - 8.0 10-14 15.51 0.5 150
OCCA - 80-85 OLEYLCETYL ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE

RIMPRO Appearance at
25°C PH
Value Iodine
Value HLB Acid Value Max Colour
(Gardner)
Max
OCCA-2 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 60+2 4.96 0.5 200
OCCA-2.5 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 57+2 5.82 0.5 200
OCCA-5.0 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 44+2 9.01 0.5 200
OCCA-10 White turbid Liquid/soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 30+2 12.45 0.5 200
OCCA-15 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 22+2 14.22 0.5 200
OCCA-20 White soft solid 6.0 - 8.0 18+2 15.35 0.5 200
OCCA-25 White soft solid 6.0 - 8.0 15+2 16.08 0.5 200
OCCA-30 White Flakes 6.0 - 8.0 13+2 16.08 0.5 200
Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate has wide range of applications and is used as emulsifier and surfactants in various industries. Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate is used in various industrial applications like automotive, paint, textile, Pharma and agrochemical. Rimpro provides Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate as per the standard and custom specific needs.

OLEYL CETYL ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE - OLEYL CETYL (50/55) ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE

RIMPRO Appearance at
25°C PH
Value Iodine
Value HLB Acid Value Max Colour
(Gardner)
Max
OCA-2 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 36-40 5.19 0.5 150
OCA-2.5 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 34-38 6.01 0.5 150
OCA-5 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 25-29 9.25 0.5 150
OCA-6.5 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 22-26 10.57 0.5 150
OCA-10 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 17-21 12.67 0.5 150
OCA-15 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 12-16 12.67 0.5 150
OCA-20 White waxy solid 6.0 - 8.0 10-14 15.51 0.5 150
OCCA - 80-85 OLEYLCETYL ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE

RIMPRO Appearance at
25°C PH
Value Iodine
Value HLB Acid Value Max Colour
(Gardner)
Max
OCCA-2 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 60+2 4.96 0.5 200
OCCA-2.5 Clear to slightly hazy, Colourless to pale Yellow liquid 6.0 - 8.0 57+2 5.82 0.5 200
OCCA-5.0 Opaque white to off White liquid 6.0 - 8.0 44+2 9.01 0.5 200
OCCA-10 White turbid Liquid/soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 30+2 12.45 0.5 200
OCCA-15 White soft paste 6.0 - 8.0 22+2 14.22 0.5 200
OCCA-20 White soft solid 6.0 - 8.0 18+2 15.35 0.5 200
OCCA-25 White soft solid 6.0 - 8.0 15+2 16.08 0.5 200
OCCA-30 White Flakes 6.0 - 8.0 13+2 16.08 0.5 200
Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate has wide range of applications and is used as emulsifier and surfactants in various industries. Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate is used in various industrial applications like automotive, paint, textile, Pharma and agrochemical. Rimpro provides Oleyl Cetyl Alcohol Ethoxylate as per the standard and custom specific needs.

OLEYL CETYL ALCOHOL ETHOXYLATE MOLE 10
Product Characteristics Product Detail
Appearance @ 25 deg C White soft paste�
pH (5% aq) 6.0-7.5
Iodine Value 17-21
HLB 12.67
Acid Value 0.5
Colour (Gardner) 2
Active 100%

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Please quote for the following wholesale product requirement - Product Name : Cetyl Stearyl Alcohol Specifications : IG C18 Industrial Grade Purity : 98% Packing Should Be 20 Kg Bag With Pallets Quantity Required : 1000 kg Shipping Terms : CIF Destination Port : Taiwan Payment Terms : L/C Or T/T Looking for suppliers from : Worldwide Contact : Chiang

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The influence of detergents, sodium tripoly-phosphates and ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol on metabolism of the fungi Penicillium verrucosum Peyronel [2010]
Stojanovic, J., University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia). Faculty of Science Jakovljevic, V., University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia). Faculty of Science Matovic, I., University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia). Faculty of Science Mijuskovic, Z., Military Medical Academy, Belgrade (Serbia) et al.
On the species of Penicillum verrucosum grown on liquid nutritious base, according to Czapek and on a variation of the same nutritious base with detergent Merix (Merima, Krusevac (Serbia)) and individual components of the same detergent: sodium tripolyphosphate and ethoxyled oleyl-cetyl alcohol in a concentration of 0.1%, following analysis were performed: pH, redox potential, proteolytic activity, the quantity of free and total organic acids, amino acids, proteins and total biomass.

Oleyl Alcohol
Oleyl-Cetyl Alcohol; 9-Octadecen-1-ol
Oleyl Alcohol
C18-H36-O
Fatty alcohols
RG4120000
143-28-2
O1021
Not available.
SPECTRUM LABORATORY PRODUCTS INC.
14422 S. SAN PEDRO STREET
GARDENA, CA 90248
CALL (310) 516-8000
SPECTRUM LABORATORY PRODUCTS INC.
14422 S. SAN PEDRO STREET
GARDENA, CA 90248
1
2 0
Material Safety Data Sheet
NFPA HMIS Personal Protective Equipment
Section 1. Chemical Product and Company Identification
Common Name/
Trade Name
Catalog
Number(s).
CAS#
RTECS
CI#
Manufacturer
Synonym
Chemical Name
Chemical Family
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
CHEMTREC (24hr) 800-424-9300
Chemical Formula
Supplier
See Section 15.
Commercial Name(s) Novol
TSCA TSCA 8(b) inventory: Oleyl
Alcohol
2
1
0
Health Hazard
Fire Hazard
Reactivity
Page Number: 1
Oleyl Alcohol
LD50: Not available.
LC50: Not available.
1) Arachidyl Alcohol 629-96-9 0-3
2) Myristal Alcohol 112-72-1 0-2
3) Cetyl Alcohol 36653-82-4 2-10
4) Oleyl Alcohol 143-28-2 85-95
Toxicological Data
on Ingredients
Name
Section 2.Composition and Information on Ingredients
Exposure Limits
TWA (mg/m3
) STEL (mg/m3
) CEIL (mg/m3 CAS # ) % by Weight
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of ingestion. Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (permeator),
of eye contact (irritant), of inhalation.
CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
MUTAGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
TERATOGENIC EFFECTS: Not available.
DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: Not available.
Repeated or prolonged exposure is not known to aggravate medical condition.
Section 3. Hazards Identification
Potential Acute Health Effects
Potential Chronic Health
Effects
Continued on Next Page
Oleyl Alcohol Page Number: 2
Do NOT induce vomiting unless directed to do so by medical personnel. Never give anything by mouth to an
unconscious person. If large quantities of this material are swallowed, call a physician immediately. Loosen tight
clothing such as a collar, tie, belt or waistband.
Check for and remove any contact lenses. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at
least 15 minutes. Get medical attention if irritation occurs.
In case of contact, immediately flush skin with plenty of water. Cover the irritated skin with an emollient. Remove
contaminated clothing and shoes. Wash clothing before reuse. Thoroughly clean shoes before reuse. Get
medical attention.
Wash with a disinfectant soap and cover the contaminated skin with an anti-bacterial cream. Seek medical
attention.
If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Get
medical attention.
Not available.
Not available.
Section 4. First Aid Measures
Eye Contact
Skin Contact
Serious Skin Contact
Inhalation
Serious Inhalation
Ingestion
Serious Ingestion
Not available.
May be combustible at high temperature.
These products are carbon oxides (CO, CO2).
CLOSED CUP: 170°C (338°F). (Tagliabue.)
Not available.
SMALL FIRE: Use DRY chemical powder.
LARGE FIRE: Use water spray, fog or foam. Do not use water jet.
Slightly flammable to flammable in presence of open flames and sparks, of heat.
Non-flammable in presence of shocks.
Not available.
Risks of explosion of the product in presence of mechanical impact: Not available.
Risks of explosion of the product in presence of static discharge: Not available.
Not available.
Section 5. Fire and Explosion Data
Flammability of the Product
Auto-Ignition Temperature
Flash Points
Flammable Limits
Products of Combustion
Fire Hazards in Presence of
Various Substances
Explosion Hazards in Presence
of Various Substances
Fire Fighting Media
and Instructions
Special Remarks on
Fire Hazards
Special Remarks on Explosion
Hazards
Absorb with an inert material and put the spilled material in an appropriate waste disposal.
Absorb with an inert material and put the spilled material in an appropriate waste disposal. Finish cleaning by
spreading water on the contaminated surface and allow to evacuate through the sanitary system.
Section 6. Accidental Release Measures
Small Spill
Large Spill
Continued on Next Page
Oleyl Alcohol Page Number: 3
Keep container tightly closed. Keep container in a cool, well-ventilated area. Do not store above 25°C (77°F).
Keep away from heat. Keep away from sources of ignition. Empty containers pose a fire risk, evaporate the
residue under a fume hood. Ground all equipment containing material. Do not breathe gas/fumes/ vapor/spray.
Avoid contact with skin. Wear suitable protective clothing. If you feel unwell, seek medical attention and show the
label when possible. Keep away from incompatibles such as oxidizing agents, acids, alkalis.
Section 7. Handling and Storage
Precautions
Storage
Provide exhaust ventilation or other engineering controls to keep the airborne concentrations of vapors below their
respective threshold limit value. Ensure that eyewash stations and safety showers are proximal to the
work-station location.
Safety glasses. Lab coat. Gloves.
Splash goggles. Full suit. Boots. Gloves. Suggested protective clothing might not be sufficient; consult a
specialist BEFORE handling this product.
Not available.
Section 8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection
Engineering Controls
Personal Protection
Personal Protection in Case of
a Large Spill
Exposure Limits
333°C (631.4°F)
Liquid. (Thick oily liquid.)
Not available.
Not applicable.
13°C (55.4°F)
0.8489 (Water = 1)
Not available.
Not available.
Not available.
Not available.
See solubility in water, diethyl ether.
Soluble in diethyl ether.
Insoluble in cold water, hot water.
Not available.
Not available.
268.47 g/mole
Alcohol like. (Slight.)
Not available.
Not available.
Section 9. Physical and Chemical Properties
Physical state and appearance Odor
Taste
Color
Molecular Weight
pH (1% soln/water)
Boiling Point
Melting Point
Critical Temperature
Specific Gravity
Vapor Pressure
Vapor Density
Volatility
Odor Threshold
Water/Oil Dist. Coeff.
Ionicity (in Water)
Dispersion Properties
Solubility
The product is stable.
Not available.
Reactive with oxidizing agents, acids, alkalis.
Not available.
Excess heat, ignition sources, incompatible materials.
Section 10. Stability and Reactivity Data
Stability
Instability Temperature
Conditions of Instability
Incompatibility with various
substances
Corrosivity
Continued on Next Page
Oleyl Alcohol Page Number: 4
Not available.
Special Remarks on Not available.
Reactivity
Special Remarks on
Corrosivity
Polymerization Will not occur.
Absorbed through skin. Eye contact.
LD50: Not available.
LC50: Not available.
Hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), of ingestion.
Slightly hazardous in case of skin contact (permeator), of inhalation.
Not available.
Not available.
Acute Potential Health Effects:
Skin: Causes skin irritation.
Eyes: Causes eye irritation.
Inhalation: Inhalation of mist or vapor may cause respiratory tract irritation.
Ingestion: May cause gastrointestinal tract irritation.
The toxicological properties of this substance have not been fully investigated.
Not available.
Section 11. Toxicological Information
Routes of Entry
Toxicity to Animals
Chronic Effects on Humans
Other Toxic Effects on
Humans
Special Remarks on
Toxicity to Animals
Special Remarks on
Chronic Effects on Humans
Special Remarks on other
Toxic Effects on Humans
Not available.
Not available.
Possibly hazardous short term degradation products are not likely. However, long term degradation products may
arise.
The product itself and its products of degradation are not toxic.
Not available.
Section 12. Ecological Information
Ecotoxicity
BOD5 and COD
Products of Biodegradation
Toxicity of the Products
of Biodegradation
Special Remarks on the
Products of Biodegradation
Section 13. Disposal Considerations
Waste Disposal Waste must be disposed of in accordance with federal, state and local environmental
control regulations.
DOT Classification Not a DOT controlled material (United States).
Not applicable.
Not applicable.
Section 14. Transport Information
Identification
Special Provisions for
Transport
Continued on Next Page
Oleyl Alcohol Page Number: 5
DOT (Pictograms)
EINECS: This product is on the European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances.
0
1
2
2
1
0
b
Not controlled under WHMIS (Canada).
R36/38- Irritating to eyes and skin.
Section 15. Other Regulatory Information and Pictograms
Other Regulations
Other Classifications WHMIS (Canada)
DSCL (EEC)
HMIS (U.S.A.) Health Hazard
Fire Hazard
Reactivity
National Fire Protection
Association (U.S.A.)
Personal Protection
Health
Flammability
Reactivity
Specific hazard
WHMIS (Canada)
(Pictograms)
DSCL (Europe)
(Pictograms)
TDG (Canada)
(Pictograms)
ADR (Europe)
(Pictograms)
Protective Equipment
Not applicable.
Lab coat.
Gloves.
Federal and State
Regulations
TSCA 8(b) inventory: Oleyl Alcohol
California
Proposition 65
Warnings
S2- Keep out of the reach of children.
S46- If swallowed, seek medical advice
immediately and show this container or label.
Continued on Next Page
Oleyl Alcohol Page Number: 6
Safety glasses.
Not available.
Not available.
CALL (310) 516-8000
All chemicals may pose unknown hazards and should be used with caution. This Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) applies only to the material as packaged. If this product is
combined with other materials, deteriorates, or becomes contaminated, it may pose hazards not mentioned in this MSDS. It shall be the user's responsibility to develop proper
methods of handling and personal protection based on the actual conditions of use. While this MSDS is based on technical data judged to be reliable, Spectrum Quality Products,
Inc. assumes no responsibility for the completeness or accuracy of the information contained herein.
Notice to Reader
Verified by Sonia Owen.
Printed 9/12/2006.
Validated by Sonia Owen on 8/11/2006.
Other Special
Considerations
References
Section 16. Other Information
MSDS Code O3032

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